Literary Man
  • The Only Book I’d Save in a Fire I don’t know why. Call me crazy, but it’s the only physical book I return to, time and again and again, and find new truth and comic darkness and wisdom about the endless permutations of style. And it was style, I believe, that drew me back into the book so many times at first, the repeated feeling […] 0 Comments July 19, 2018
  • On Rereading John Green’s THE FAULT IN OUR STARS I first read John Green’s mesmerizing, beloved novel THE FAULT IN OUR STARS three years ago: I read it in a single three hour sitting, laughed harder than I have ever laughed at a novel, and felt the most intense “feely feels” towards the ends since the first time I read ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF […] 0 Comments June 19, 2018
  • T.S. Eliot Proves Your High School English Teacher Wrong On the eve of another face-freezing snowstorm, we literarians on the East Coast have nothing better to do than argue the merits of a rye versus bourbon Manhattan (trying one of each, probably, to know which tastes better), and revel in the lovely letters of T.S. Eliot, particularly a passage in which he modestly compares […] 0 Comments January 3, 2018
  • Top Three Favorite Novels Read in 2017 This is a succinct account of the three best novels–or I should say the novels I enjoyed the most–that I happened to read in the 2017 calendar year. Many reviews about all three of them may no doubt provide layered context for their greatness, and so I will just share the ones I liked and […] 0 Comments December 8, 2017
  • What to Get Your Literary Grandpa for Christmas For fear of immediately turning into a crotchety old man, I have for years held back the ever growing urge to start reading biographies. It is the classic fate of every grandpa or dad who swears he doesn’t really read to house an entire stack of WW2 or Civil War biographies hiding in the attic somewhere. I […] 0 Comments December 5, 2017
  • Our Anger is Right, Our Poetry is True In the bloodbath of 2017 (and American history), the risk of alienation is real: we feel the anger and perceived helplessness of our surroundings–watching as the “centre cannot hold”–and poetry, as always, allows us to share the anger and therefore connect with artists and thinkers who still dream of surviving this nation intact. From Waxwing, […] 0 Comments October 17, 2017
  • Fort Atlantic’s New Album SHADOW SHAKER now available So pumped to share the excellent news that Fort Atlantic’s latest album “Shadow Shaker” has finally been released in its entirety on Bandcamp. I have enjoyed the guilty pleasure of a stolen bootleg cassette tape which shorted the electrical circuitry of my Jeep Cherokee the first time I played it (seriously). I have loved this […] 0 Comments October 4, 2017
  • What the Reviewers Missed with LINCOLN IN THE BARDO They were baffled, mostly. Most of the reviews I read agreed upon the formal boldness and narrative power of LINCOLN IN THE BARDO. Some pointed out the “themepark” quality of the Oak Hill Cemetery where George Saunders’ novel takes place, as, widely observed, President Lincoln goes to visit his beloved son Willie, recently succumbed to […] 0 Comments July 18, 2017
  • This is the Treasure of a Physical Paper Book You can write something, say, on the eve of one of your life’s most significant events, and as long as the book lives in your library you will have a memory of what you were reading the day your son was born.   0 Comments April 18, 2017
  • Loved Lidia Yuknavitch’s THE SMALL BACKS OF CHILDREN Dark, formally experimental, reflective like broken glass on its way into the anonymous neck of a villain, beautiful in its contemplation of art and sexuality, strung with sentences of light and introspection and poetry throughout, light typographical play, a quick punch-like pace, and subversive in simply not giving a fuck. Reminded me of old Henry […] 0 Comments January 26, 2017