Literary Man
  • Phil Knight on Ken Kesey I am loving Phil Knight’s memoir SHOE DOG. Well written, funny, strange, educational, and so deeply Oregonian. Here’s Phil on beloved Oregonian icon Ken Kesey: “I knew Kesey at the University of Oregon. He wrestled, and I ran track, and on rainy days we’d do indoor workouts at their same facility. When his first novel […] 0 Comments July 19, 2016
  • An Act of Peace is Never Wrong Saw this on Irvine Welsh’s twitter feed with the words “Oh, America,” and thought of 1968, Kent State, Vietnam, and wondered how much worse it will get before it gets better. Would love to attribute the photography so let me know if you know who took this powerful image. **Update, the photo was taken by […] 0 Comments July 10, 2016
  • Recommended: C.E. Morgan’s Mesmerizing debut ALL THE LIVING C.E. Morgan became reasonably famous with her 20 Under 40 New Yorker inclusion, and when I heard that her newest novel was about horse racing in Kentucky I set out to start at the beginning of her publication career. ALL THE LIVING is her excellent, baroque debut set in a rural town in central-eastern Kentucky. […] 0 Comments May 27, 2016
  • I miss the days of Richard Brautigan Just finished Trout Fishing in America only three weeks after blazing through A Confederate General in Big Sur, and I am filled with the feeling of nostalgia for a time when you could just bum around the West Coast with your girlfriend and a few weird buddies and camp and fish and drink and tool […] 0 Comments May 2, 2016
  • Booze, Boats, and Broads in this Excellent Thriller There’s something irresistible and so attractive about starting a novel with a murder: for me, I can’t bear the thought of not knowing who did it. And so it was with Charles Cutter’s debut novel THE PINK PONY (from independent publisher Arbutus Press), I blazed through this excellent debut in a single sitting. Set in Northern Michigan, […] 0 Comments January 15, 2016
  • Gregory Rabassa: In Token of My Admiration for His Genius Thrilled to share that my interview with Gregory Rabassa, translator of 100 Years of Solitude and Hopscotch and so many other legendary works of Latin American literature, is now available at The Common. Thanks for Melody Nixon and Jen Acker for consistently putting out such a wonderful magazine. Here’s the link, enjoy!     0 Comments January 10, 2016
  • If Only Every Book Could Finish Like This I do. I really do want every book to leave you wondering why every book isn’t as special as The Fault in Our Stars. Hot damn, people!! Sometimes books best-sell for a reason. It is futile to add more noise to the Internet’s democratic blessing of this work. Observe this, from Amazon:   That is over […] 0 Comments May 22, 2015
  • Remembering Elaine’s Loved this in the NYRB this week. Miss those boozy nights of literary rapscallionism. 0 Comments May 20, 2015
  • Currently obsessed with… Jeff Vandermeer’s The Southern Reach Trilogy. Have blazed through the first two in less than 48 hours. Like Kafka but creepier and more entertaining! 0 Comments May 19, 2015
  • Entire USC MFA Class Drops Out Damn. Check out the letter they wrote to the administration: The University of Southern California’s Roski School of Art and Design’s internationally-renowned MFA program is, sorrowfully, over as we have come to know and love it. For most of the past decade, this graduate program has excelled as an exemplary institutional model and major epicenter […] 0 Comments May 15, 2015