Literary Man
  • Our Anger is Right, Our Poetry is True In the bloodbath of 2017 (and American history), the risk of alienation is real: we feel the anger and perceived helplessness of our surroundings–watching as the “centre cannot hold”–and poetry, as always, allows us to share the anger and therefore connect with artists and thinkers who still dream of surviving this nation intact. From Waxwing, […] 0 Comments October 17, 2017
  • Fort Atlantic’s New Album SHADOW SHAKER now available So pumped to share the excellent news that Fort Atlantic’s latest album “Shadow Shaker” has finally been released in its entirety on Bandcamp. I have enjoyed the guilty pleasure of a stolen bootleg cassette tape which shorted the electrical circuitry of my Jeep Cherokee the first time I played it (seriously). I have loved this […] 0 Comments October 4, 2017
  • What the Reviewers Missed with LINCOLN IN THE BARDO They were baffled, mostly. Most of the reviews I read agreed upon the formal boldness and narrative power of LINCOLN IN THE BARDO. Some pointed out the “themepark” quality of the Oak Hill Cemetery where George Saunders’ novel takes place, as, widely observed, President Lincoln goes to visit his beloved son Willie, recently succumbed to […] 0 Comments July 18, 2017
  • This is the Treasure of a Physical Paper Book You can write something, say, on the eve of one of your life’s most significant events, and as long as the book lives in your library you will have a memory of what you were reading the day your son was born.   0 Comments April 18, 2017
  • Loved Lidia Yuknavitch’s THE SMALL BACKS OF CHILDREN Dark, formally experimental, reflective like broken glass on its way into the anonymous neck of a villain, beautiful in its contemplation of art and sexuality, strung with sentences of light and introspection and poetry throughout, light typographical play, a quick punch-like pace, and subversive in simply not giving a fuck. Reminded me of old Henry […] 0 Comments January 26, 2017
  • Houellebecq Predicting Trump More than a Year Ago On page 42 of Michel Houellebecq’s darkly comic masterpiece: “We see it among the intellectuals, politicians, and journalists of the 1930s, all of whom were convinced that Hitler would ‘come to see reason.’ It may well be impossible for people who have lived and prospered under a given social system to imagine the point of […] 0 Comments November 29, 2016
  • On NERVE and the New Panopticon Loved the premise of this movie with Emma Roberts and Dave Franco even if it went off the rails towards the end. And so, on one of those Barnes and Noble mornings where É was running around I ripped through the book NERVE that inspired the movie. Nice quick pacing, plotting, strong language (resonant of […] 0 Comments November 12, 2016
  • Wings of the Marijuana Butterfly One could write an entire book just ABOUT Michelle Alexander’s devastating treatise THE NEW JIM CROW. Pulling just a small moment of brilliance, though, I marked a passage that set off in my mind a moment of “the wings of the butterfly” adage, that saying that the smallest transactional movement in one part of the […] 0 Comments November 4, 2016
  • Before Standing Rock, ND: there is Almanac of the Dead Twenty-five years ago, one of the great American novels of the twentieth century was published to mixed reviews. The book, written by Leslie Marmon Silko, was a 763-page poetic freight-train called Almanac of the Dead. If you, too, are an American and you have been reading all your life, searching for an explanation—or expiation—for the […] 0 Comments October 31, 2016
  • Re-Reading A MOVEABLE FEAST Fifteen Years Later I first read Ernest Hemingway’s A MOVEABLE FEAST in the summer after my sophomore year of college, about six weeks before I was scheduled to fly to France to study abroad for four months in Aix-En-Provence. I had started studying French because of how intoxicating I found the language F. Scott Fitzgerald and some of […] 0 Comments October 28, 2016